Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Book Review- Can't Sleep Without Sheep

By Susanna Leonard Hill
Illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka
Published by Bloomsbury Kids
Released on September 14th, 2010
Source- Bloomsbury
5 Stars- Highly Recommend

Wanted: Trustworthy animal for nighttime position. Must be nimble and reliable . . .

Whenever Ava can't sleep, she counts sheep. But Ava takes so long to fall asleep, it's the sheep that are growing tired—until finally, they quit! When the sheep promise to find a replacement that Ava can count on, chaos ensues as chickens, cows, pigs, hippos, and more try their hand at jumping over Ava's fence. Finding the perfectly peaceful replacement for sheep might not be so easy after all.

With irresistibly adorable art, this delightful take on a familiar sleep tactic is sure to become a bedtime favorite (quoted from Bloomsbury's site).

My kids really enjoyed reading about Ava and her sheep. Ava usually needs to count sheep before she sleeps, but when the sheep decide to quit they look for their replacements. Among the animals who try out for the job are a horse, pigs, penguins, buffalo, hippos, and many other animals. Will the sheep realize they're the perfect fit for the job and stay, or will Ava be counting a different animal to sleep each night?

This is such a delightful bedtime read. The story is fun and engaging, and received a lot of laughs from my kids and the illustrations are great! Can't Sleep Without Sheep gets high marks in our household.

You can find out more about Can't Sleep Without Sheep on Bloomsbury's site here


  1. Liked your style of writing. Interesting blog you have. I heard about the book before as well but wasn't sure whether to go for it or not but now I am definitely going to buy it.

  2. Hi Demine- Thank you so much. My kids love this story. I hope you'll find it just as delightful as we do.


I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~