Monday, August 15, 2011

Book Review: Blue Chicken

Written & Illustrated By: Deborah Freedman
Published by: Viking/Penguin Books
To Be Released on September 15th, 2011
Source: ARC from publisher to review
Ages 3 & up
5 stars- It's A Great Read
Purchase from: Penguin| Amazon| Barnes & Noble

In this deceptively simple picture book, author-illustrator Deborah Freedman has created an irresistible character that springs to life and wreaks havoc in a farmyard with a pot of blue paint. The innocent chicken just wants to help, but things get worse and worse-and bluer and bluer--the more she tries. Playing with colors and perspective, and using minimal text, this richly layered story reveals new things to see and laugh about with each reading.

This is such a delightfully, fun, creative read. I love the way Deborah brings her story to life through her illustrations. By creating a story that is centered on a painting and then bringing that painting to life within the story is both clever and engaging. It's also unique, as there aren't many children's books I've read that have done this.

Blue Chicken is a story who's illustrations tell most of the story. When a curiously little chicken decides to scamper out of the drawing and over to the jar of blue paint, chaos ensues as everything from the chickens, the duck, the cow, the flowers and the white barn become blue. Looking for away to quickly fix the problem duck and chicken knock over a jar of water which restores everything to their proper colorings.

This adventure is one my children loved and I enjoyed reading along with them. The illustrations are charming, lively and engaging. I'd highly recommend picking this book up when it's out. It's one that will be a huge hit with children of all ages and perfect for school and home settings.


  1. We're looking forward to reading this one! The cover art is awesome.

  2. Brimful- This entire book is awesome! I hope you enjoy it as much as I have. It's worth having for the illustrations alone.


I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~