Thursday, October 20, 2011

Book Review: The Not-So-Scary Monster Handbook

Written and Illustrated by: Dave Ross
Published by: HarperFestival
Release Date: August 5, 2003
Source: Bought.
Ages: 4-8
t
Purchase: amazon | Barnes and Noble | AbeBooks

Synopsis:
Have vampires turned your life upside down?
Are you tired of mischief-making mummies?
Fed up with Frankenstein?


If so, this book is for you!

Finally, a handy how-to guide for dealing with pesky monsters. Lift the flaps and learn where monsters play and how to send them away!

When my son was in preschool, I kept trying to find monster-friendly books for him to read during the weeks before Halloween. You see, he was the kid who would pout/cry/scream as we walked through the Halloween aisles in stores. Imagine the fun I had shopping for Halloween decorations and candy. Well, now I can laugh but then I kept thinking there has to be a way to show him the fun in all this instead of just the sheer terror.

This is the book for those kids who find monsters to be beyond frightening. The story pokes fun in a gentle and silly way reminding us that monsters are not all around us, after all. Here's a quote:

It's easy to tell if King Kong is hiding under your bed. (lift the flap)
Your nose will be touching the ceiling. (pictured is a King Kong sweet-faced monster saying "Nightey-night.")

So, if there's a kid in your house who is just plain scared of Halloween costumes, be sure to check out this book. It's out-of-print now, but the links above have it for a good price. It's worth the investment in not having to get up with a nightmarish little one this time of year.

2 comments:

  1. Great review. Sounds like a fun book!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Debra - It's really a sweet book and perfect for a toddler/preschooler/Kinder who is scared of Halloween monsters.

    ReplyDelete

I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~