Sunday, June 3, 2012

Book Review: Sweet Moon Baby, An Adoption Tale by Karen Henry Clark

Illustrated by: Patrice Barton
Published by: Alfred A. Knopf
Released on: November 9th, 2010
Source: book from author to review
Ages: 2 & up
5 stars: I Loved It
Purchase from: Amazon | Barnes & Noble

This is the story of one baby’s journey from her birth parents in China, who dream of a better life for their daughter, to her adoptive parents on the other side of the world, who dream of the life they can give her.

A turtle, a peacock, a monkey, a panda, and some fish shepherd the baby as she floats in a basket on a moonlit, winding river into the loving arms of her new parents. 

Perfect for bedtime reading, Karen Henry Clark’s poetic text, reminiscent of a lullaby, and Patrice Barton’s textured and gentle-hued illustrations capture the great love between parents and children and the miraculous journey of adoption.
-quoted from Goodreads

This is such an adorable story about the adoption of a sweet little girl and the parents who have longed to have her in their family. This is not an in-depth story about adoption, but a beautiful, heart warming story about the journey of a baby girl born in China, and her whimsical journey to her new home. The illustrations are absolutely amazing! They capture the feeling of this story perfectly. The story's prose and the beautiful illustrations make this the perfect bedtime book for young readers, infant and older. It's one of those books that you'll want to read again and again.


  1. Thanks for sharing this. When we adopted our daughter from China, we used to love reading books like this.

    1. You're so welcome Natalie! This is such a sweet story. I plan on giving my book to a friend who adopted their little girl from China.

  2. Awww! What a sweet story & I love the illustrations.

    1. It is a very sweet story. The illustrations are amazing.


I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~