Saturday, November 12, 2016

PUG MEETS PIG by Sue Lowell Gallion / Book Review #picturebookmonth

By: Sue Lowell Gallion
Illustrated by: Joyce Wan
Published by: Simon & Schuster 
Released on: September 27th, 2016
Age: 3 & up
Rating: 4.5 Stars - We Really Enjoyed It!
Purchase from: Simon & Schuster | Amazon | B&N
Add it to Goodreads
A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for my honest review 

An unlikely pair—a pug and a pig!—realize that it’s better to be together. 

Pug is a very happy pup. He has his own yard, his own bowl, and even his own cozy bed! That is, until Pig moves in and starts eating from Pug’s bowl, interrupting Pug’s routine, and, worst of all, sleeping in Pug’s bed. Will Pug and Pig ever learn to live together as friends? 

This sweet and silly story about a darling duo celebrates the timeless themes of embracing change, being kind to others, and finding friends in unlikely places.

An adorable story about friendship, and being kind. 

Change isn't always easy. Pug loved it how things were before Pig moves in. Now Pig, who's different from Pug, is invading his space, and using his things. Pug is having a very hard time adjusting to the change and isn't very nice to Pig. One day all that changes, because one simple act of kindness. Pug realizes that Pig isn't so different from him, and feels bad for how he's treated him. A friendships ensures, and now these two friends enjoy spending time together.

With adorable illustrations, and an easy to comprehend story, Pug Meets Pig is sure to be an instant hit for readers of all ages. There's a wonderful message about friendship, kindness, acceptance, and learning to adapt to change. This book is great for sparking discussions about these kid friendly themes. This book also makes a wonderful read aloud. 

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I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~