Wednesday, August 1, 2018

GRASSHOPPER MAGIC by Lynne Jonell / Book Review #GrasshopperMagic


By: Lynne Jonell
Illustrated by: Brandon Dorman
Published by: Random House
Released on: May 28th, 2014
Series: Magical Mix Ups #3
Ages: 7 & up
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A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for my honest review

Chicken? Abner is not a chicken, no matter what his brother Derek says. But when it comes to giving a speech in front of the whole town, Abner is . . . well . . . he's more than a little nervous.

   Then his sister Tate has an idea--bravery lessons. And the first one? Eat a roasted grasshopper. But Abner forgot something important. There's magic in the ground under his family's house and grasshoppers hatch from eggs laid in the ground. So what, exactly, would happen if a kid ate a grasshopper that had been soaking up magic all year long? BOING!


   Lynne Jonell follows up her Minnesota Book Award finalist, Texas Bluebonnet Master List choice, and Junior Library Guild selection Hamster Magic with a third story of the Willow family's rowdy run-ins with mixed-up magic.


A fun beginning reader. Written for kids who are transitioning from basic beginning readers, and picture books, this book's story is one that simplistic, engaging and at times silly. Mixed with a little bit of magic, and some adventure, this story is one doesn't require any over thinking in terms of the story. That is what makes this story great for a transitional beginning readers. This simple, short story, includes illustrations that will keep young readers invested in this story. This book would work great for reading groups in 1st and 2nd grade. 

OTHER BOOKS IN THE SERIES



1 comment:

  1. Yay for enjoying this one :D All the books looks pretty adorable. Not for me, but looks so cute even so. <3

    ReplyDelete

I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~