Wednesday, September 26, 2018

J IS FOR JACK-O'-LANTERN: A Halloween Alphabet by Denise Brennan Nelson / Book Review


Written by: Denise Brennan-Nelson
Illustrated by: Donald Wu
Published by: Sleeping Bear Press
Released on: June 29th, 2009
Ages: 3 & up
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Rating: 4 Owlets 
Source: School Library 

Who lit the first jack-o'-lantern? What creature of the night must return to his grave by dawn? And why do we holler "Trick or treat"? J is for Jack-O'-Lantern: A Halloween Alphabet invites you to come along on this A-Z adventure and celebration of all things that "go bump in the night."
Poetry and prose combine to entertain and educate.
H is for Haunted House
A haunted house; you better beware.
Only enter if you dare.
Monsters lurking, looking mean--
Just can't wait to make you scream!
Classic autumn games, jokes, and recipes (including gooey deviled egg eyeballs!) help round out the Halloween festivities. Atmospheric artwork blends just enough fun with fright to provide the perfect backdrop.


This book is must for any Halloween book round up. The Halloween alphabet is fun to read, and appealing to young readers as they discover all Halloween offers from letters A-Z. To add to the book's overall appeal, included in the margins for each letter, is a brief history on the Halloween/fall item featured. For example, Autumn. A is for Autumn. Included with the ABC mention of Autumn  there's also a brief history on it. It's interesting to learn about various Halloween traditions, and things associated with Halloween. To add to the over all festive appeal are some really cute illustrations that give the book a fun, festive atmospheric feel. 

2 comments:

  1. What a charming idea for an alphabet book. Very original! I'll have to check it out.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Looks like such a cute book :D Glad you liked it a bunch lovely. <3

    ReplyDelete

I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~ Anna Quindlen

Good children's literature appeals not only to
the child in the adult, but to the adult in the child.
~ Anonymous ~